On RT America, I discuss the recent court ruling in a lawsuit where an unnamed telecommunications company (believed to be Credo) challenged the gag provisions in FBI national security letters.

A US district court in California found in a decision made public on Friday that  Nondisclosure or gag provisions of National Security Letters “significantly infringe upon speech regarding controversial government powers.” The provisions were found to violate the First Amendment and the “separation of powers principles.” The court also determined the provisions were effectively preventing public debate on surveillance.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) brought the lawsuit.They celebrated the victory and declared, “The government’s gags have truncated the public debate on these controversial surveillance tools. Our client looks forward to the day when it can publicly discuss its experience.”

For more on NSLs and a breakdown of the ruling, go here.