When Intelligence Leaders Call Snowden a ‘Traitor,’ He’s More Likely to Be Granted Permanent Asylum

One would think United States officials would be interested in having former National Security Agency contractor returned home, but every time someone from the US makes statements, such as the ones made in a hearing before the House intelligence committee yesterday, it becomes more likely that a country will grant him permanent asylum.

Snowden already has been granted temporary asylum by Russia. He may or may not request an extension of this temporary asylum. He may choose to try and get to another country; perhaps, a country in Latin America. But it would seem that he is in a place where it is impossible for the US to snatch him and bring him back to the US for a trial.

Yesterday, Rep. Michele Bachmann took the opportunity to use her time during the hearing, in which NSA Director Gen. Keith Alexander, Director for National Intelligence James Clapper, Deputy NSA Director John Inglis and Deputy Attorney General James Cole were present, to put Snowden on trial for treason, a crime which the Justice Department has not charged him with committing:

BACHMANN: Is it — would it be accurate to say that Mr. Snowden was in an analogy acting as a research librarian who unlawfully took the research books home for the night? Is that kind of what he did?

ALEXANDER: And longer.

When Intelligence Leaders Call Snowden a ‘Traitor,’ He’s More Likely to Be Granted Permanent Asylum

One would think United States officials would be interested in having former National Security Agency contractor returned home, but every time someone from the US makes statements, such as the ones made in a hearing before the House intelligence committee yesterday, it becomes more likely that a country will grant him permanent asylum.

Snowden already has been granted temporary asylum by Russia. He may or may not request an extension of this temporary asylum. He may choose to try and get to another country; perhaps, a country in Latin America. But it would seem that he is in a place where it is impossible for the US to snatch him and bring him back to the US for a trial.

Yesterday, Rep. Michele Bachmann took the opportunity to use her time during the hearing, in which NSA Director Gen. Keith Alexander, Director for National Intelligence James Clapper, Deputy NSA Director John Inglis and Deputy Attorney General James Cole were present, to put Snowden on trial for treason, a crime which the Justice Department has not charged him with committing:

BACHMANN: Is it — would it be accurate to say that Mr. Snowden was in an analogy acting as a research librarian who unlawfully took the research books home for the night? Is that kind of what he did?

ALEXANDER: And longer.

BACHMANN: And longer. Did Mr. Snowden violate his constitutional oath by revealing to the detriment of United States national security interests classified information?

ALEXANDER: He did.

BACHMANN: Were Mr. Snowden’s actions illegal?

ALEXANDER: They were.

BACHMANN: Were Mr. Snowden’s actions unconstitutional?

ALEXANDER: They were.

BACHMANN: Did Mr. Snowden put at risk America’s national security interests?

ALEXANDER: They did.

BACHMANN: Did Mr. Snowden’s illegal, unconstitutional revelations help the terrorists who seek to kill Americans?

ALEXANDER: I believe they will.

BACHMANN: It was recently…

ALEXANDER: I would say they have, and they will.

Alexander essentially agreed that what Snowden did was “illegal” and “unconstitutional” and had and would help “terrorists who seek to kill Americans.”

These are the kinds of statements that make it near impossible to receive a fair trial in the United States. They bolster Snowden’s case for permanent asylum. (more…)