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Jeff Kaye

About Me:
Jeffrey Kaye is a psychologist in private practice in San Francisco, where he works with adults and couples in psychotherapy. He worked over 10 years professionally with torture victims and asylum applicants. Active in the anti-torture movement since 2006, he has his own blog, Invictus. He has published previously at Truthout, Alternet, and The Public Record.
 
Website:
http://my.firedoglake.com/members/valtin/
About Me:
Jeffrey Kaye is a psychologist in private practice in San Francisco, where he works with adults and couples in psychotherapy. He worked over 10 years professionally with torture victims and asylum applicants. Active in the anti-torture movement since 2006, he has his own blog, Invictus. He has published previously at Truthout, Alternet, and The Public Record.

More on the Press and the Question of Torture in the Army Field Manual

By: Wednesday January 15, 2014 11:08 pm

While the mainstream press fell down on its responsibility to report the truth about the 2006 rewrite of the Army Field Manual, burying its use of coercive interrogation techniques amounting to torture, the alternative press and bloggers weren’t doing much better. Meanwhile, the foreign press was quizzing government figures about the unequal treatment of detainees in relation to Geneva Convention, and getting bureaucratic double-talk in response. The dialogue around the Army Field Manual hasn’t changed much in the ensuing seven years, and in large part this can be traced back to how consensus around the government’s interrogation manual was established.

How the Press, the Pentagon, and Even Human Rights Groups Sold Us an Army Field Manual that (Still) Includes Torture (updated)

By: Sunday January 12, 2014 6:54 pm

On the 12th anniversary of Guantanamo, it’s time to look back and see how the U.S. press and human rights community were suborned to accept a policy about interrogations that included the use of psychological torture.

CIA Document Suggests U.S. Lied About Biological, Chemical Weapon Use in the Korean War

By: Tuesday December 10, 2013 2:03 am

According to a CIA document declassified in March 2006, the U.S. government lied publicly about pushing for a United Nations “on-the-spot” investigation into Soviet, Chinese and North Korean charges of U.S. use of biological weapons (BW) during the Korean War. The reason the U.S. didn’t want any investigation was because an “actual investigation” would reveal military operations, “which, if revealed, could do us psychological as well as military damage.” The declassified memo specifically stated as an example of what could be revealed “8th Army preparations or operations (e.g. chemical warfare).”

Top US Psychologist Allegedly Met with James Mitchell in Days Before Zubaydah Torture

By: Sunday December 8, 2013 9:33 pm

A little noted book in 2011 cited CIA’s Kirk Hubbard in stating that famed psychologist Martin Seligman met to help James Mitchell with interrogation strategies just days before the former SERE psychologist flew to a CIA black site and began the torture of Abu Zubaydah.

IMAP/OSF Report Calls for Investigation of Drug Given to All Guantanamo Detainees

By: Friday November 15, 2013 2:20 am

Breaking a three-year silence by the medical and human rights community, a panel of doctors, attorneys, human rights professionals, university professors and ethics experts have called for an investigation into the use of mefloquine on detainees at Guantanamo Naval Prison. The prison camp had instituted in very early 2002 an unprecedented policy of administering full-treatment doses of mefloquine to all incoming detainees at Guantanamo. Complicating the report’s finding was the fact the man who signed off on the mefloquine policy, Captain Albert Shimkus, was also on the task force that investigated the medical ethical issues regarding interrogation that occupied the report.

Blue Ribbon Task Force Says Army Field Manual on Interrogation Allows Torture, Abuse

By: Tuesday November 5, 2013 12:33 am

A report by a multidisciplinary task force, made up largely of medical professionals, ethicists and legal experts, has called on President Obama to issue an executive order outlawing torture and other abusive techniques currently in use in the military’s Army Field Manual on interrogations. The Task Force, which wrote the report for The Institute on Medicine as a Profession (IMAP) and the Open Society Foundations (OSF), has also called on the Department of Defense to rewrite the Army Field Manual in accordance with such an executive order.

But politically, it has been difficult for the issue of abuse in the Army Field Manual to get traction.

Man Who Sought Truth in Teigin Mass Murder Case Dies in Tokyo

By: Sunday October 20, 2013 9:41 pm

A man who gave much of his life to figure out the truth about the 65-year-old Teigin mass poisoning case died alone in a Tokyo house last week. With him may go the last best chance to solve the crime, a crime that has been linked to top secret biological warfare work by the Japanese and a controversial cover-up of that work by the U.S. government.

US Covered-Up for Decades the Largest Use of Biological & Chemical Weapons in History

By: Sunday September 8, 2013 7:00 pm

The U.S. pretends to be pursuing noble causes for peace in threatening to launch military strikes against Syria for supposed chemical warfare attacks. But the U.S. record on both biological and chemical warfare is anything but noble. It reeks of self-interest, and involved the U.S. in a cover-up of the largest, most sinister program of biological and chemical experimentation and warfare in modern history.

Will Bogdan’s Claims of Insufficient Staffing Cause Al Qaeda to Attack Guantanamo?

By: Thursday August 8, 2013 12:48 am

When the government released a redacted copy of a declaration by the chief of Guantanamo detention security, they evidently forgot they had already released an earlier version. The result was a jumble of conflicting redactions, one of which highlighted claims about staffing problems at the DoD prison camp. Behind the claims, though, appeared to be both an attempt to cover up the death of a detainee last year, and a maneuver to keep attorney-client meetings in the same camp where a sophisticated surveillance program was discovered earlier this year: another example about how nothing we hear from the government about Guantanamo is straight-forward.

SOUTHCOM Commander Spins Latif Death Investigation to Justify Groin Searches

By: Thursday July 18, 2013 2:56 am

SOUTHCOM’s General Kelly files a declaration with the court that draws on an investigation into the death of Adnan Latif to justify a policy of genital searches at Guantanamo. It’s no surprise that he misrepresents the conclusions of that report for his own purposes. Those conclusions paint a damning picture of command failure and non-accountability at the Cuban-based U.S. prison.

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