New DoD Directive on Detainees Allows Sleep and Sensory Deprivation, Biometric IDs

By: Wednesday September 17, 2014 7:13 pm

A new directive from the Department of Defense regarding its Detainee Program fails to offer any protections against the use of torture techniques like isolation, sleep deprivation, and forms of sensory deprivation. Obama’s detainee program has not really changed since the days of Bush and Cheney. With the addition of biometric identification and the provision for indefinite detention, it may even be worse.

DoD Directive Used Duplicity to Hide Current Use of SERE Torture Techniques in Interrogations

By: Sunday April 20, 2014 9:42 pm

A key U.S. Defense Department directive rewritten only a month before Barack Obama was first elected President used a legalistically-carved definition for SERE techniques to hide the fact that, despite the fact DoD maintained such techniques were “banned,” important components of the SERE interrogation techniques that could amount to torture were still available to U.S. interrogators.

How the Press, the Pentagon, and Even Human Rights Groups Sold Us an Army Field Manual that (Still) Includes Torture (updated)

By: Sunday January 12, 2014 6:54 pm

On the 12th anniversary of Guantanamo, it’s time to look back and see how the U.S. press and human rights community were suborned to accept a policy about interrogations that included the use of psychological torture.

Top US Psychologist Allegedly Met with James Mitchell in Days Before Zubaydah Torture

By: Sunday December 8, 2013 9:33 pm

A little noted book in 2011 cited CIA’s Kirk Hubbard in stating that famed psychologist Martin Seligman met to help James Mitchell with interrogation strategies just days before the former SERE psychologist flew to a CIA black site and began the torture of Abu Zubaydah.

IMAP/OSF Report Calls for Investigation of Drug Given to All Guantanamo Detainees

By: Friday November 15, 2013 2:20 am

Breaking a three-year silence by the medical and human rights community, a panel of doctors, attorneys, human rights professionals, university professors and ethics experts have called for an investigation into the use of mefloquine on detainees at Guantanamo Naval Prison. The prison camp had instituted in very early 2002 an unprecedented policy of administering full-treatment doses of mefloquine to all incoming detainees at Guantanamo. Complicating the report’s finding was the fact the man who signed off on the mefloquine policy, Captain Albert Shimkus, was also on the task force that investigated the medical ethical issues regarding interrogation that occupied the report.

IG Report Cover-up: Top Military Officials Hid Evidence of Pre-9/11 Al Qaeda Intelligence

By: Saturday September 10, 2011 7:07 pm

A highly secret Pentagon intelligence unit was tracking Osama Bin Laden in 2000. They knew the targets included the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. They suspected the use of planes to fly into buildings. They were told to fold their tent by higher-ups. A later Inspector General investigation, prompted by the protests of one of the intel unit’s leaders, covered up what really happened. But newly released documents are finally allowing the contours of the full story to come out.

Feinstein: “Service members continue to receive drug linked to permanent brain damage”

By: Saturday August 20, 2011 6:53 pm

On August 18, Senator Dianne Feinstein put out a press release indicating that the Department of Defense should consider taking the anti-malarial drug mefloquine, also known as Lariam, out of the DoD drug formulary as it is too dangerous. Feinstein also indicated the drug has been administered to military personnel without the safeguards put in place by a 2009 Department of Defense protocol. But the drug was also used in massive doses on all the Guantanamo detainees, an unprecedented application of the drug on prisoners for supposed preventative purposes.

New Report: DoD Used Water Torture, Hid Behind “Waterboarding” Definition

By: Tuesday August 2, 2011 3:56 pm

A new examination of waterboarding and other “water treatment” torture practices by the Department of Defense, published today at Truthout, seriously calls into question the accepted narrative around waterboarding by the U.S. government. Up until now, it’s been accepted that only the CIA waterboarded detainees at black sites in the “war on terror,” and only three prisoners at that. But a new investigation of available materials from Congress, Inspector General reports, first-hand and second-hand accounts in the press, as well as other documentary evidence, shows that use of waterboarding-style torture was likely used widely by U.S. forces, from Afghanistan to Iraq to Guantanamo.

“I saw many people get killed under torture in Kandahar”

By: Tuesday August 2, 2011 12:13 am

In the RT video, Kurnaz talks about his stay in Kandahar, imprisoned by the U.S. military before he was shipped to Guantanamo. He was age 19.

“In Kandahar,” Kurnaz says, “was happening all kinds of things, what you can just imagine under torture. I saw many people get killed under torture in Kandahar.”

DoJ Cites Koppelman, Wittes Hit Pieces on Scott Horton’s “Guantanamo Suicides”

By: Friday July 15, 2011 12:59 pm

Alex Koppelman and Benjamin Wittes, both of whom wrote hit pieces attacking Scott Horton’s award-winning article in Harper’s, “The Guantanamo Suicides,” won a bit of infamy by having their attacks cited in a government brief seeking a denial of a lawsuit filed by the parents of two of the dead prisoners. What’s even more galling is that their articles were poorly researched and basically government apologia. The U.S. government appears to have taken notice, and used their articles for their own purposes, making Koppelman and Wittes, wittingly or not, government proxies in the matter of the Guantanamo suicides controversy.

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